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Nassau Station

Nassau Station Robotic Telescope

Image Gallery


This page is devoted to images of interest that have been taken with the CWRU Nassau Station Robotic Telescope direct imaging camera. The collection here should grow steadily as we continue to work to bring the telescope fully online.

Click on a thumbnail to get the full sized picture.

Image Gallery Index

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DescriptionImage
July 11, 1999
September 28, 2000
A 60 second exposure of the Cats Eye nebula, with no filter (the image is in false color) and a color composite image of the same nebula.
Cats Eye Nebula Cats Eye Nebula
October 12, 1999
A color composite of the globular cluster M15. Globular clusters are old objects with cool stars. This picture was taken an composed by Marta Lewandowska and Sean Maxwell as part of an ASTR 306 project.
M15
July 22, 1999
September 26, 2000A 300 second R filter exposure of NGC 7009 (the Saturn Nebula). And also a color composite image. Remember from the images of the Ring Nebula (M57) in gallery 4 that the R Filter emphasizes the ionized hydrogen in the nebula. Most of the light from this nebula is dominated by the ionized background that forms a featureless football shaped blob. But on inspection of the R filter images we see indeed that there is structure deep inside the cocoon of the nebula. The false color image is provided to show the outer ring feature that is not readily apparent in the monochromatic image.
R Filter; Saturn Nebula (NGC 7009) False color image of NGC 7009
Composit True color image of NGC 7009
July 22, 1999 &
July 19, 2000

A 120 second no filter exposure(top) and color composite (bottom) of the planet Uranus. The planet is way over exposed in the 60 exposure but that allows us to see the moons Ariel, Umbriel, Titania and Oberon. Uranus is much brighter in the B and V filters than R and I because the methane in its atmosphere absorbs a lot of light in the range covered by the R and I filters. This gives it a bluish green tinge.
Uranus

Uranus

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Image Gallery Index


©2000 CWRU Astronomy Dept.
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Last modified September 30, 2000
Case Western Reserve University